A 10 Years Retrospective Study of Oral Cancer in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Department, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Sabah, Malaysia

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A 10 Years Retrospective Study of Oral Cancer in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Department, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Sabah, Malaysia

Fong Siew Han, Chia Min Lim, Ling Vuan Wong, Marzuki bin Zainal Abidin: A 10 Years Retrospective Study of Oral Cancer in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Department, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Sabah, Malaysia. Mal. J. Oral Maxillofac. Surg. 2017; 15: 10–16.

Abstract: This retrospective study aims to present a 10 year overview of oral cancer at the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Department, Queen Elizabeth Hospital. All patients with histologically confirmed malignant oral lesions from 2005 till 2016 were enrolled. Data were extracted with a standardized data collection form, which included patient’s demographic background, habits practised, clinical and histopathological features, types of treatment, reasons patients refused treatment and management outcome. Kaplan Meier method was used to analyze the 5-year survival time and rate. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) was the most common oral cancer. It has a slight female predilection and was found mostly in patients with a mean age of 60±14.22-years-old and among the Dusun ethnicity. Majority of patients (74.8%) showed no functional deficit and few (12.6%) had pre-malignant lesions. Most of the SCC was found in stage IV (59.1%) and tongue was the common site (49.9%). 37.4% of patients received surgical excision and half of them underwent neck dissection. The 5-year overall survival rate was 50.86% and the survival time for those patients who received surgery, palliative management, concurrent chemo-radiotherapy and refused treatment were 77, 15, 12 and 30 months respectively. SCC and salivary gland malignancy were the two most common oral malignancies in this 10 year cohort. The five year survival outcome for SCC was poor when patients presented at stage IV. Surgery remained the treatment of choice and survival expectancy was significantly prolonged with surgical intervention.