Osteonecrosis and Spontaneous Teeth Exfoliation in the Maxilla: What could be the cause?

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Osteonecrosis and Spontaneous Teeth Exfoliation in the Maxilla: What could be the cause?

Kathreena Kadir, Norhayati Omar: Osteonecrosis and Spontaneous Teeth Exfoliation in the Maxilla: What could be the cause? Mal. J. Oral Maxillofac. Surg. 2017; 15: 31–36.

Abstract: Herpes zoster is a common viral infection, of which the oral soft tissue manifestations are widely known and recognized. However, reports of osteonecrosis and spontaneous tooth loss following herpes zoster infection of the fifth cranial nerve are extremely rare. Only fewer than 35 previously documented cases of post-zoster osteonecrosis have been found in literature. Up to now, no exact mechanism by which herpes zoster induces these destructive changes in the alveolar bone and teeth has been proposed. We are reporting an additional case of osteonecrosis and spontaneous teeth exfoliation following herpes zoster infection, which occurred in the right maxilla of a young man whose Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) status remained undiagnosed until the osteonecrosis of the jaw became apparent. The local surgical therapy turned out to be successful. In this paper, the importance of this potential complication of herpes zoster of the trigeminal nerve is highlighted, and the correlation between osteonecrosis and HIV infection is discussed.